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How to Get a $30,000 Loan

A $30,000 personal loan can help you cover a large purchase or unexpected expense.

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By Anna Baluch

Written by

Anna Baluch

Writer

Anna Baluch is a personal finance freelance writer with years of experience writing for well-known media outlets in the business and personal finance space. Her work can be found on media outlets like The Balance, Freedom Debt Relief, LendingTree, Credit Karma, Nav, and RateGenius. She holds a bachelor's degree in marketing from Northwood University and an MBA from Roosevelt University.

Edited by Jared Hughes

Written by

Jared Hughes

Editor

Jared Hughes is a personal loan editor for Credible and Fox Money, and has been producing digital content for more than six years.

Updated April 18, 2024

Editorial disclosure: Our goal is to give you the tools and confidence you need to improve your finances. Although we receive compensation from our partner lenders, whom we will always identify, all opinions are our own. Credible Operations, Inc. NMLS # 1681276, is referred to here as “Credible.”

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Credible takeaways

  • A $30,000 personal loan can be used for almost any purpose.
  • Online lenders, banks, and credit unions offer $30,000 loans.
  • Even if you have bad credit, you can still get a $30,000 loan.

You can get a $30,000 loan by shopping around and prequalifying with multiple lenders. Available from online lenders, banks, and credit unions, a $30,000 loan can be used to cover a medical bill, home repair, or almost any other purpose. However, finding the right $30,000 loan for you can depend on several factors, including the annual percentage rate (APR) and repayment term.

Where to get a $30,000 loan

You can find $30,000 loans from a few different places:

  • Online lenders: If you need fast cash, a loan from an online lender may be your best bet. The application process takes place entirely online and depending on the lender, you can receive your funds the same day you get approved or in a few business days.
  • Banks: Many large and smaller, community banks offer loans in addition to other products like checking and savings accounts. If you already have an account with a certain bank, you might be able to turn to them for a competitive APR on a loan.
  • Credit unions: Because they’re nonprofit organizations, credit unions can often have lower APRs than banks. They may also have more flexible requirements, but you may have to become a member to apply for a loan.

Check Out: Best Same-Day Loans

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A note on APR

When comparing loans, you may see APR referenced quite a bit. The APR is the total cost of your loan, and includes the interest rate and upfront fees. This makes it a better tool for comparison purposes instead of just relying on interest rate alone.

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7.80% - 35.99%

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620

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8.49% - 35.99%

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11.69% - 35.99%

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560

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11.72% - 17.99%

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14.30% - 35.99%

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640

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Types of $30,000 loans

There are two types of $30,000 loans, unsecured and secured loans. Both are personal loans, but secure the loan in different ways.

Unsecured loans

Unsecured personal loans provide a lump sum which you repay with interest through fixed monthly payments over a set term. Most repayment terms can range from one to seven years.

Unsecured loan lenders scrutinize your credit profile and may require good to excellent credit to qualify for a $30,000 personal loan.

While unsecured loans don’t require collateral, they can have higher APRs as a result. However, unsecured loans can have lower APRs than a credit card. The average APR for a 24-month personal loan was 12.49% in February 2024, while the average credit card APR was 21.59%, according to The Federal Reserve.

Check Out: Personal Loan vs. Credit Card

Secured loans

Unlike an unsecured loan, these loans can be secured by collateral, like your house, car, or investment accounts. While secured loans can have lower APRs because of your collateral, you can lose your asset if you default on the loan, making them more of a risk for you than the lender.

Learn More: How Does a Personal Loan Default Happen?

How to qualify for a $30,000 loan

Requirements to qualify for a $30,000 personal loan can vary but most lenders typically evaluate the following factors.

  • Credit profile: Before lending to you, lenders may review your credit score and history to determine how much of a risk you may be. Your payment history tells them how consistent you may be with making your payments on time, while your score can determine your APR and loan amount. For example, a credit score below 550 may result in a higher APR.
  • Income: If you’re requesting a loan amount of $30,000, a lender may want to verify that you have a high enough income to repay that amount back, plus interest. Many lenders have minimum income requirements, so shop around to find the right one for you.
  • Debt-to-income ratio (DTI): Your DTI tells a lender how much of your current gross monthly income goes toward debt payments each month. This factor gives insight into whether or not you can afford another payment. Most lenders prefer a DTI of 35% or less.

Related: How Much of a Personal Loan Can I Get?

How to apply for a $30,000 loan

If you’re interested in a $30,000 loan, here are the steps to apply:

  1. Check your credit: Visit AnnualCreditReport.com to pull free copies of your credit reports from the three major credit bureaus. You can dispute any errors and possibly improve your credit score.
  2. Shop around: Not all $30,000 loans are created equal. Research and explore options from different lenders so you can zero in on the ideal loan for you. Compare APRs, fees, and terms.
  3. Prequalify: You can prequalify with multiple lenders and it won’t impact your credit score, however applying for the loan may. Prequalification is not an offer of credit and the final rate you receive may be different from the estimate.
  4. Fill out an application: After you determine the right $30,000 loan for you, complete the application online or in-person. Be prepared to submit documents, like your pay stubs and bank statements. The lender will then perform a hard credit pull once you apply, which can bring your score down temporarily.
  5. Get your funds: Upon approval, most lenders can distribute your funds via direct deposit as soon as the same or next business day. Some lenders may take up to a week.

Learn More: How Long Does It Take To Get a Personal Loan?

How to get a $30,000 loan with bad credit

If you have bad credit, you may still be able to get a $30,000 loan. These tips can increase your chances of qualifying with bad credit.

  • Consider secured loans: Secured loans require collateral or something valuable you own, like your home, car, or savings account. They may be easier to get than unsecured loans, and can often have lower APRs. But if you default, the lender can seize your collateral.
  • Explore credit unions and community banks: Credit unions and community banks tend to have more lenient qualification requirements than banks or some online lenders. You also may be more likely to get approved for a $30,000 loan if you’re already a customer of the bank or credit union.
  • Get a cosigner: A cosigner can be your spouse, parent, or anyone else you trust who has solid credit and stable income. They can become responsible for paying back the loan if you default. If you apply with a cosigner, you might be able to land a $30,000 loan that you wouldn’t qualify for on your own. However, not all lenders may accept cosigners.
  • Apply with a co-borrower: Co-borrowers can also be responsible for payments and can be someone with good credit that can help you get approved. However, unlike a cosigner, a co-borrower has equal access to the funds.
  • Improve your credit: Pay your bills on time, repay debt, and keep old credit accounts open. By doing so, you can boost your credit score and the likelihood of approval.

Related: Ways To Pay Off Debt Fast

Personal loans for bad credit

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3.93.9

Credible rating

Fixed (APR)

7.80% - 35.99%

Loan Amounts

$1000 to $50000

Min. Credit Score

620

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4.54.5

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8.49% - 35.99%

Loan Amounts

$1000 to $50000

Min. Credit Score

600

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3.93.9

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9.95% - 35.99%

Loan Amounts

$2000 to $35000

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550

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4.34.3

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11.69% - 35.99%

Loan Amounts

$1000 to $50000

Min. Credit Score

560

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3.93.9

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18.00% - 35.99%

Loan Amounts

$1500 to $20000

Min. Credit Score

540

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All APRs reflect autopay and loyalty discounts where available | LightStream disclosure | SoFi Disclosures | Read more about Rates and Terms

$30,000 loan FAQ

How much would a $30,000 loan cost per month?

The monthly cost of a $30,000 loan depends on a couple of factors which can include the APR and repayment term. For example, if you took out a $30,000 loan with a seven year term and a 16% APR, you might pay $595.86 per month. By the time you pay off the loan, you may end up paying $20,052 in total interest.

How hard is it to get a $30,000 dollar loan?

In general, lenders extend $30,000 loans to borrowers with good to excellent credit, which is typically 670 and higher. But there may be lenders who lend to borrowers with bad credit. If you’re having difficulty qualifying, you may consider getting a cosigner or co-borrower to help you get approved for the loan. A secured loan may also help you qualify and land you a lower APR, but your collateral may be at risk if you default.

What is a secured personal loan vs unsecured?

Unsecured loans can have higher APRs, as a lender examines your credit profile to determine eligibility for the loan. Secured loans are backed by collateral, like your car or home and can have a lower APR as a result. However, If you stop making payments, the lender may take your collateral to recoup its losses.

Read More:

Meet the expert:
Anna Baluch

Anna Baluch is a personal finance freelance writer with years of experience writing for well-known media outlets in the business and personal finance space. Her work can be found on media outlets like The Balance, Freedom Debt Relief, LendingTree, Credit Karma, Nav, and RateGenius. She holds a bachelor's degree in marketing from Northwood University and an MBA from Roosevelt University.